Vulcan’s Peak

Archive for the 'Shakespeare' category

Thought for the Day

March 15, 2005 12:21 am

Brutus:
Remember March, the Ides of March remember:
Did not great Julius bleed for justice’ sake?
What villain touch’d his body, that did stab,
And not for justice? What! shall one of us,
That struck the foremost man of all this world
But for supporting robbers,–shall we now
Contaminate our fingers with base bribes
And sell the mighty space of our large honours
For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman.

– Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, IV iii

Beware

March 15, 2004 7:17 pm

Brutus:
Remember March, the Ides of March remember:
Did not great Julius bleed for justice’ sake?
What villain touch’d his body, that did stab,
And not for justice? What! shall one of us,
That struck the foremost man of all this world
But for supporting robbers,–shall we now
Contaminate our fingers with base bribes
And sell the mighty space of our large honours
For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman.

– Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, IV iii

Shakespeare, mostly

November 16, 2003 2:20 pm

My roommate left me this morning…
I was glad she went, though. Her parents came up to take her home – with any luck, she’ll get better faster in her own bed. Pneumonia is icky.

Friday night I went to see the theater department put on “Twisted Tales from Shakespeare” which was well done and very funny! They took Hamlet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and acted out rather Monty Python-esque versions with only four actors (two male, two female). Narration was supplied by a stereotypical pompous scholar (who also discussed things like Shakespeare’s background and the authorship question), with comic remarks from the “Footnoter”. The program alone was hilarious – one whole page was headed with the warning “After the program, there may be a test”. It contained such gems as

(on Hamlet)
1. Have you noticed how, in Shakespeare’s plays, when people said they saw a ghost, they usually did? Were people more trustworthy in those days? Were ghosts?

and
(on A Midsummer Night’s Dream)
2. What is your idea of a wild thyme?

and, as a message from the author of the book the play was based on, Richard Armour,
“Since I have been a longtime professor of literature at a number of colleges and universities, you may wonder whether I ever taught Shakespeare. How could I? Shakespeare died in 1616.”

I was in stitches just reading the program.